Tag Archives: Leonard Heldreth

COMPREHENSIVE CRITIC

Knowledge, much work goes into film reviews By Bryon Ennis As a regular reader of the Marquette Monthly, I look forward to the analysis of recent movies by Leonard Heldreth. I have been aware that Leonard contributed this column to the MM for many years, but it was not until I began discussing a tribute […]

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HOME CINEMA

Reviewed films feature horses, dragons and spider persons By Leonard Heldreth Two of this month’s films deal with training animals, and the third revisits that notorious radioactive spider. The Mustang Sometimes a new point of view can bring a fresh prospective to familiar genres and scenes. French director Laure de Clermont-Tonnerre had previously made a […]

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HOME CINEMA

Films explore troubled family relationships By Leonard Heldreth The films this month includes a conflict that affects a writer and his talented wife, and an exploration of gay conversion therapy. THE WIFE Swedish director Björn Runge’s film, The Wife, explores the dynamics of a long-time marriage in which the wife has the talent but the […]

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HOME CINEMA

If ‘Old Man’ is Redford’s last film, he made a graceful exit By Leonard Heldreth The films this month follow the exploits of a gentlemanly bank robber from the past and explore some very contemporary conflicts in black and white relationships. The Old Man & the Gun David Lowery’s most recent film, The Old Man […]

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RACISM RECOUNTED

BlacKkKlansman recalls 40-year-old events and serves as a relevant message for confronting racism today   By Leonard Heldreth The films this month include two movies that are oriented toward minority groups and a biopic of an alcoholic, disabled cartoonist. BlacKkKlansman Spike Lee returns to the top of his form as director with BlacKkKlansman. Angry, messy, […]

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Movies aimed at smaller, but appreciative audiences

  By Leonard Heldreth The films this month were not designed to be blockbusters but were aimed at a limited but generally appreciative audience. DAMSEL In an opening scene that hints at Samuel Beckett’s plays, Damsel telegraphs its plans to take varying degrees of liberty with the Western genre. Two men sit on a bench […]

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HOME CINEMA

By Leonard Heldreth Our films this month are all about ghosts, aliens and demons.   A Quiet Place Horror movies often use sounds to frighten an audience—a creaking door, howling wind, rustling noises—but John Krasinski’s A Quiet Place is set in a world that tries to remain silent. The film starts with “Day 89” in […]

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MOVIE VARIETY

By Leonard Heldreth Films this month range from a mainstream gay love story to an animated tale set in Afghanistan. Love, Simon Love, Simon has received substantial critical and box-office attention for two reasons. First, it’s a successful teen romantic comedy in the style of Sixteen Candles, The Breakfast Club, or other films by John […]

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DRAMA TAKE CENTER STAGE

New films are based closely on actual events By Leonard Heldreth All the films this month are close adaptations of real events and people. All the Money in the World Ridley Scott’s newest thriller is based on John Pearson’s 1995 book, Painfully Rich: The Outrageous Fortune and Misfortunes of the Heirs of J. Paul Getty. […]

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Suspense, horror films examine race in September picks

By Leonard Heldreth This month we examine the eccentricities of European businessmen, cringe in two suspenseful films about people trapped, and explore the Amazon basin in the early 20th century. Is Toni Erdmann the best 162-minute German comedy you are likely to see? Is it even a comedy, although it has several hilarious scenes? Certainly, […]

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Hot summer, cool movies

By Leonard Heldreth This month we look at an award-winning Iranian film, a film about black women mathematicians, two documentaries, and Hugh Jackman’s last Wolverine film. What do you get when you insert an Iranian production of Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman into a film about a husband and wife trying to keep their […]

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Totalitarian life and unnatural beings become cinema centerpieces

by Leonard Heldreth Two of this month’s films demonstrate the pressures and difficulties of living under rigid or totalitarian systems, and the other two look at unusual events or beings intruding into our everyday worlds. Leviathan, the fourth film by Russian director Andrey Zvyagintsev, takes its name from the Book of Job: God asks Job, […]

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Home Cinema – September 2015

by Leonard Heldreth Revenge in various ways, shapes and forms The films this month are about revenge served hot or cold, a soldier isolated in the Belfast war zone, vampires facing problems in New Zealand and a new ballet for the NYCB. How’s that for a mix? Argentinean writer and director Damián Szifron defies all […]

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Time-lapse with a twist

by Leonard Heldreth The films this month include a unique view of a boy growing up, an intricate spy thriller and two sequels that emphasize sequelicity. Boyhood We’ve all seen it to the extent that it’s a cliché—a plant shoots up from the ground, leaves appear, a bud surges up and a flower opens into […]

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January selections provide action-packed entertainment

by Leonard Heldreth The selections this month are a powerful film from Ireland and three summer blockbuster films, of varying merit, that are generally entertaining. Calvary A powerful drama set in Ireland, Calvary starts with a quotation from St. Augustine: “Despair not, one of the thieves was spared; presume not, one of the thieves was […]

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