Tag Archives: Leonard Heldreth

HOME CINEMA

By Leonard Heldreth Our films this month are all about ghosts, aliens and demons.   A Quiet Place Horror movies often use sounds to frighten an audience—a creaking door, howling wind, rustling noises—but John Krasinski’s A Quiet Place is set in a world that tries to remain silent. The film starts with “Day 89” in […]

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MOVIE VARIETY

By Leonard Heldreth Films this month range from a mainstream gay love story to an animated tale set in Afghanistan. Love, Simon Love, Simon has received substantial critical and box-office attention for two reasons. First, it’s a successful teen romantic comedy in the style of Sixteen Candles, The Breakfast Club, or other films by John […]

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DRAMA TAKE CENTER STAGE

New films are based closely on actual events By Leonard Heldreth All the films this month are close adaptations of real events and people. All the Money in the World Ridley Scott’s newest thriller is based on John Pearson’s 1995 book, Painfully Rich: The Outrageous Fortune and Misfortunes of the Heirs of J. Paul Getty. […]

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Suspense, horror films examine race in September picks

By Leonard Heldreth This month we examine the eccentricities of European businessmen, cringe in two suspenseful films about people trapped, and explore the Amazon basin in the early 20th century. Is Toni Erdmann the best 162-minute German comedy you are likely to see? Is it even a comedy, although it has several hilarious scenes? Certainly, […]

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Hot summer, cool movies

By Leonard Heldreth This month we look at an award-winning Iranian film, a film about black women mathematicians, two documentaries, and Hugh Jackman’s last Wolverine film. What do you get when you insert an Iranian production of Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman into a film about a husband and wife trying to keep their […]

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Totalitarian life and unnatural beings become cinema centerpieces

by Leonard Heldreth Two of this month’s films demonstrate the pressures and difficulties of living under rigid or totalitarian systems, and the other two look at unusual events or beings intruding into our everyday worlds. Leviathan, the fourth film by Russian director Andrey Zvyagintsev, takes its name from the Book of Job: God asks Job, […]

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Home Cinema – September 2015

by Leonard Heldreth Revenge in various ways, shapes and forms The films this month are about revenge served hot or cold, a soldier isolated in the Belfast war zone, vampires facing problems in New Zealand and a new ballet for the NYCB. How’s that for a mix? Argentinean writer and director Damián Szifron defies all […]

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Time-lapse with a twist

by Leonard Heldreth The films this month include a unique view of a boy growing up, an intricate spy thriller and two sequels that emphasize sequelicity. Boyhood We’ve all seen it to the extent that it’s a cliché—a plant shoots up from the ground, leaves appear, a bud surges up and a flower opens into […]

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January selections provide action-packed entertainment

by Leonard Heldreth The selections this month are a powerful film from Ireland and three summer blockbuster films, of varying merit, that are generally entertaining. Calvary A powerful drama set in Ireland, Calvary starts with a quotation from St. Augustine: “Despair not, one of the thieves was spared; presume not, one of the thieves was […]

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Recent films feature action, alternative rock and AIDS

by Leonard Heldreth This month’s films include two science fiction blockbusters, an independent film about the Seattle music scene and a film based on one of the first plays about AIDS. Live. Die. Repeat Originally released as a film titled The Edge of Tomorrow, with the poster tagline “Live. Die. Repeat.”, that title was dropped […]

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Genre-bending films provide offbeat entertainment

All of the films this month are offbeat, genre-bending, original examples of the breadth of offerings available in the current cinema.  Only Lovers Left Alive Jim Jarmusch is one of America’s best independent filmmakers, one who always follows his own artistic muse, even if it means completing only eleven films in thirty years. While not […]

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Genre-bending films provide offbeat entertainment

by Leonard G. Heldreth All of the films this month are offbeat, genre-bending, original examples of the breadth of offerings available in the current cinema. Only Lovers Left Alive Jim Jarmusch is one of America’s best independent filmmakers, one who always follows his own artistic muse, even if it means completing only eleven films in thirty […]

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Powerful women, Wes Anderson wow

by Leonard Heldreth This month’s offerings include three films about powerful women and Wes Anderson’s whimsical, labyrinthian story of a grand hotel. Two of them star Ralph Fiennes, so we’ll begin and end with them. The Invisible Woman Romantic and sexual passion are frequently at odds with regulations and expectations of polite society, and were […]

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Films feature kung fu, cops, crashes, divorce, Disney

by Leonard Heldreth The films this month are quite a mixture—a gorgeous kung fu film, a detective miniseries, an Iranian divorce film, a documentary about the hazards of snowboarding, and a bizarre film shot on location in Disney World. The Grandmaster It seems strange to praise a kung fu movie for its visual beauty, its subtlety, […]

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Insight into the world’s oldest profession

by Leonard Heldreth Two films this month deal with what is said to be the world’s oldest profession, while the remaining two examine personal experience as public spectacle and “whatever works.” Chéri In the Belle Époque era in France, which extended from the 1870s to the First World War, culture flourished and beautiful people did […]

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