Downtown Marquette hosts Baraga Harvest Fest fun

1410_lop_harvest_fest_graphicThe onset of autumn means something different to many of us; some look forward to pumpkin spice lattes, wearing hooded sweatshirts and watching the leaves change, while others begrudgingly put swimsuits away and lament the loss of beach weather. Fortunately, there is an OctobThe onset of autumn means something different to many of us; some look forward to pumpkin spice lattes, wearing hooded sweatshirts and watching the leaves change, while others begrudgingly put swimsuits away and lament the loss of beach weather. Fortunately, there is an October event in Downtown Marquette to bring together those who love fall and those who love to get outdoors and have a good time—the second annual Baraga Harvest Fest, October 11 from 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
The event is themed for all ages, and will include entertainment—live bands, a street dance, living statues, a Carhartt fashion show featuring local celebrities, a Baraga Avenue chalk-painting contest sponsored by the U.P. Children’s Museum, flower crafts, a Big Equipment petting zoo, children’s activities and a photo booth.
In addition to carnival fare like Jimmy Krack Korn popcorn, elephant ears and T’s Taste of Chicago glazed nuts, food will be available from Downtown Marquette vendors. Das Steinhaus will have offerings from their German-based menu, and Stucko’s Bar and Grill will provide options from their popular and varied menu. Donckers—a downtown mainstay since 1896—will boast some of its creations, which use local and organic ingredients, as well as the store-made confections that have been popular for generations.
“The second annual Baraga Avenue Harvest Fest is being presented this year by New Holland Carhartt Woodman Beer. We are excited to partner with them and Getz’s to bring the event to the community. It’s an opportunity for the community to come out and enjoy the crisp fall weather while exploring the businesses that are located on Baraga Avenue,” says Mona Lang, executive director of the Marquette Downtown Development Authority.
Those of us who live, eat and shop in Marquette know the atmosphere of Downtown is vital year-round, regardless of the season.
Downtown Marquette remains an active blend of new shops and many who have been around for generations, each adding a unique personality to the mix.
Other places to stop on Baraga Avenue:
• Dead River Coffee—From its website, “We custom roast a wide selection of fine Arabica coffees brought from exotic locales with strange-sounding names, available by the cup or the pound.”
• Marquette Baking Company—A variety of artisan-made breads and pastries made daily.
Places to eat near the Harvest Festival:
• Aubree’s Pizza—Locally owned, Aubree’s offers gourmet pizzas, sandwiches and desserts, as well as Michigan beer on tap.
• Babycakes Muffin Company—Open since 1988, Babycakes has a long-standing reputation of being the perfect place to grab a homemade muffin, biscotti, granola or even breakfast or lunch while people-watching on Washington Street.
• Capers at the Landmark Inn—Throughout its esteemed history, The Landmark (formerly the Northland Hotel) has housed such celebrities as Amelia Earhart, Abbott and Costello, Maya Angelou and Bill Cosby. Capers, the restaurant located inside the hotel, is open seven days a week and incorporates regional and local ingredients into its dishes.
• Elizabeth’s Chophouse—Offering quality cuts from both land and sea, the Chophouse has unique offerings such as lobster tempura, steak cut onion rings, apple rum raisin pie and chocolate strata pie.
• L’Attitude Café and Bistro—“Sophisticated yet unpretentious” according to its website, the L’Attitude menu has dishes to share as well as an array of burgers, with spirits and wine to pair.
• Lagniappe Cajun Creole Eatery— Since 2006, Lagniappe has been offering Downtown Marquette a taste of Louisiana, complete with alligator bites, crawfish, frog legs, gumbo and seafood bisque.
• The Portside Inn—Family owned and operated, the Portside is famous for its breadsticks—made from scratch since 1983 and served with house-made garlic cheese spread.
• Vierling Restaurant and Marquette Harbor Brewery—Located in one of the most historically-rich Downtown buildings, the Vierling restaurant recently received accolades in Lake Superior Magazine for its whitefish dinner, while its craft beer creations are equally popular.
• Yoop Phoria—New to Downtown, this frozen yogurt shop has already made a name for itself for its rotating flavors of self-serve “fro yo,” along with its buffet of fruit, candy, cereal and other sweet toppings.
Places to shop near the Harvest Festival:
• Chocolay River Trading Company—If it’s home décor you’re looking for, Chocolay River specializes in rustic furniture made with tree limbs, twigs, bark, antlers, and other natural materials.
• Getz’s Clothiers—Founded in the 1880s, Getz’s has grown and evolved while staying true to the store’s original vision. It now features clothing from more than 170 vendors.
• Revolutions—A new addition to the Masonic Center, Revolutions is a youth center focused on teaching constructive activities such as bicycle and ski repair, in order to create outdoor and creative enthusiasm in local youth.
• Switchback Gear Exchange—Buying used camping and outdoor gear, then selling it to those who need it is what Switchback is all about. It accepts several brands of gear, and with the amount of camping, hiking, fishing, hunting and other outdoor sports in the U.P., they have a lot to choose from.
• Zero Degrees Artist Galley — Presenting works from both established and emerging artists, this gallery features artisan crafts and fine art such as ceramics, fiber, greeting cards, jewelry, mixed media, painting, illustration, woodworking, photography and sculpture.
— Becky Greiner
Editor’s Note: This is part one of a three-part series. Watch for more about where to shop, eat and browse in Downtown Marquette in the November and December issues of Marquette Monthly.er event in Downtown Marquette to bring together those who love fall and those who love to get outdoors and have a good time—the second annual Baraga Harvest Fest, October 11 from 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
The event is themed for all ages, and will include entertainment—live bands, a street dance, living statues, a Carhartt fashion show featuring local celebrities, a Baraga Avenue chalk-painting contest sponsored by the U.P. Children’s Museum, flower crafts, a Big Equipment petting zoo, children’s activities and a photo booth.1410_lop_harvest_fest_dda_logo
In addition to carnival fare like Jimmy Krack Korn popcorn, elephant ears and T’s Taste of Chicago glazed nuts, food will be available from Downtown Marquette vendors. Das Steinhaus will have offerings from their German-based menu, and Stucko’s Bar and Grill will provide options from their popular and varied menu. Donckers—a downtown mainstay since 1896—will boast some of its creations, which use local and organic ingredients, as well as the store-made confections that have been popular for generations.
“The second annual Baraga Avenue Harvest Fest is being presented this year by New Holland Carhartt Woodman Beer. We are excited to partner with them and Getz’s to bring the event to the community. It’s an opportunity for the community to come out and enjoy the crisp fall weather while exploring the businesses that are located on Baraga Avenue,” says Mona Lang, executive director of the Marquette Downtown Development Authority.
Those of us who live, eat and shop in Marquette know the atmosphere of Downtown is vital year-round, regardless of the season.
Downtown Marquette remains an active blend of new shops and many who have been around for generations, each adding a unique personality to the mix.
Other places to stop on Baraga Avenue:
• Dead River Coffee—From its website, “We custom roast a wide selection of fine Arabica coffees brought from exotic locales with strange-sounding names, available by the cup or the pound.”
• Marquette Baking Company—A variety of artisan-made breads and pastries made daily.
Places to eat near the Harvest Festival:
• Aubree’s Pizza—Locally owned, Aubree’s offers gourmet pizzas, sandwiches and desserts, as well as Michigan beer on tap.
• Babycakes Muffin Company—Open since 1988, Babycakes has a long-standing reputation of being the perfect place to grab a homemade muffin, biscotti, granola or even breakfast or lunch while people-watching on Washington Street.
• Capers at the Landmark Inn—Throughout its esteemed history, The Landmark (formerly the Northland Hotel) has housed such celebrities as Amelia Earhart, Abbott and Costello, Maya Angelou and Bill Cosby. Capers, the restaurant located inside the hotel, is open seven days a week and incorporates regional and local ingredients into its dishes.
• Elizabeth’s Chophouse—Offering quality cuts from both land and sea, the Chophouse has unique offerings such as lobster tempura, steak cut onion rings, apple rum raisin pie and chocolate strata pie.
• L’Attitude Café and Bistro—“Sophisticated yet unpretentious” according to its website, the L’Attitude menu has dishes to share as well as an array of burgers, with spirits and wine to pair.
• Lagniappe Cajun Creole Eatery— Since 2006, Lagniappe has been offering Downtown Marquette a taste of Louisiana, complete with alligator bites, crawfish, frog legs, gumbo and seafood bisque.
• The Portside Inn—Family owned and operated, the Portside is famous for its breadsticks—made from scratch since 1983 and served with house-made garlic cheese spread.
• Vierling Restaurant and Marquette Harbor Brewery—Located in one of the most historically-rich Downtown buildings, the Vierling restaurant recently received accolades in Lake Superior Magazine for its whitefish dinner, while its craft beer creations are equally popular.
• Yoop Phoria—New to Downtown, this frozen yogurt shop has already made a name for itself for its rotating flavors of self-serve “fro yo,” along with its buffet of fruit, candy, cereal and other sweet toppings.
Places to shop near the Harvest Festival:
• Chocolay River Trading Company—If it’s home décor you’re looking for, Chocolay River specializes in rustic furniture made with tree limbs, twigs, bark, antlers, and other natural materials.
• Getz’s Clothiers—Founded in the 1880s, Getz’s has grown and evolved while staying true to the store’s original vision. It now features clothing from more than 170 vendors.
• Revolutions—A new addition to the Masonic Center, Revolutions is a youth center focused on teaching constructive activities such as bicycle and ski repair, in order to create outdoor and creative enthusiasm in local youth.
• Switchback Gear Exchange—Buying used camping and outdoor gear, then selling it to those who need it is what Switchback is all about. It accepts several brands of gear, and with the amount of camping, hiking, fishing, hunting and other outdoor sports in the U.P., they have a lot to choose from.
• Zero Degrees Artist Galley — Presenting works from both established and emerging artists, this gallery features artisan crafts and fine art such as ceramics, fiber, greeting cards, jewelry, mixed media, painting, illustration, woodworking, photography and sculpture.
— Becky Greiner
Editor’s Note: This is part one of a three-part series. Watch for more about where to shop, eat and browse in Downtown Marquette in the November and December issues of Marquette Monthly.

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