Home Cinema RSS feed for this section

HOME CINEMA

Sundance winner and a musical treasure reviewed The films this month include a great Sundance Award winner and a long-lost musical treasure.   THE LAST BLACK MAN IN SAN FRANCISCO Joe Talbot won the best director at Sundance for the film, The Last Black Man in San Francisco, which also won a Special Jury award; […]

Read more

HOME CINEMA

Reviewed films feature horses, dragons and spider persons By Leonard Heldreth Two of this month’s films deal with training animals, and the third revisits that notorious radioactive spider. The Mustang Sometimes a new point of view can bring a fresh prospective to familiar genres and scenes. French director Laure de Clermont-Tonnerre had previously made a […]

Read more

HOME CINEMA

Acting superb in Stan and Ollie   By Leonard Heldreth This month’s films include two biographical films and a new film by a controversial Greek director. STAN AND OLLIE Director John S. Baird’s film opens in 1937 when Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy were at the peak of their fame, and he sets the stage […]

Read more

Two films offer views of racism

HOME CINEMA • By Leonard Heldreth THE GREEN BOOK The title of The Green Book refers to The Negro Motorist Green Book, a travel guide published annually from 1936 to 1966 that listed establishments where black customers were welcome. In the Jim Crow South and parts of the North where segregation was enforced, such a […]

Read more

HOME CINEMA

Films explore troubled family relationships By Leonard Heldreth The films this month includes a conflict that affects a writer and his talented wife, and an exploration of gay conversion therapy. THE WIFE Swedish director Björn Runge’s film, The Wife, explores the dynamics of a long-time marriage in which the wife has the talent but the […]

Read more

HOME CINEMA

If ‘Old Man’ is Redford’s last film, he made a graceful exit By Leonard Heldreth The films this month follow the exploits of a gentlemanly bank robber from the past and explore some very contemporary conflicts in black and white relationships. The Old Man & the Gun David Lowery’s most recent film, The Old Man […]

Read more

RACISM RECOUNTED

BlacKkKlansman recalls 40-year-old events and serves as a relevant message for confronting racism today   By Leonard Heldreth The films this month include two movies that are oriented toward minority groups and a biopic of an alcoholic, disabled cartoonist. BlacKkKlansman Spike Lee returns to the top of his form as director with BlacKkKlansman. Angry, messy, […]

Read more

Movies aimed at smaller, but appreciative audiences

  By Leonard Heldreth The films this month were not designed to be blockbusters but were aimed at a limited but generally appreciative audience. DAMSEL In an opening scene that hints at Samuel Beckett’s plays, Damsel telegraphs its plans to take varying degrees of liberty with the Western genre. Two men sit on a bench […]

Read more

HOME CINEMA

By Leonard Heldreth Our films this month are all about ghosts, aliens and demons.   A Quiet Place Horror movies often use sounds to frighten an audience—a creaking door, howling wind, rustling noises—but John Krasinski’s A Quiet Place is set in a world that tries to remain silent. The film starts with “Day 89” in […]

Read more

MOVIE VARIETY

By Leonard Heldreth Films this month range from a mainstream gay love story to an animated tale set in Afghanistan. Love, Simon Love, Simon has received substantial critical and box-office attention for two reasons. First, it’s a successful teen romantic comedy in the style of Sixteen Candles, The Breakfast Club, or other films by John […]

Read more

DRAMA TAKE CENTER STAGE

New films are based closely on actual events By Leonard Heldreth All the films this month are close adaptations of real events and people. All the Money in the World Ridley Scott’s newest thriller is based on John Pearson’s 1995 book, Painfully Rich: The Outrageous Fortune and Misfortunes of the Heirs of J. Paul Getty. […]

Read more

Two tales of love

Love stories underpin May’s picks By Leonard Heldreth Our films this month are two love stories, but neither fits the traditional Hollywood pattern. The Shape of Water The story of a beautiful woman pursued by an amorous beast has a long history in film, going back at least as far as silent films like The […]

Read more

Home Cinema

HOME CINEMA Sequels, films about powerful women, and some short discussions constitute the column this month. Blade Runner 2049 Blade Runner 2049 is a direct sequel to the original film, and anyone expecting to understand and enjoy it should first watch Blade Runner The Final Cut. The original film has become available in three versions […]

Read more

Robbery, allegory, war round out picks

By Leonard Heldreth Two films about bank robberies, a surrealistic allegory, and an epic war film are the recommendations for this month. Logan Lucky Stephen Soderbergh has returned to feature films after a 4-year hiatus during which he directed the HBO film, Behind the Candelabra, and completed all the episodes of the TV series, The […]

Read more

Some films delight, others fall short

By Leonard G. Heldreth The films this month include two thrillers, a meditation on youth, and a nostalgic look at a Western actor, Sam Elliott. Wind River Taylor Sheridan, the screenwriter and director of Wind River, has had experience both in front of and behind the cameras. As an actor, he played in Sons of […]

Read more