August 2016 Family Friendly Community Guide

Upper Peninsula Luge Club to host summer luge clinics for kids

The Upper Peninsula Luge Club will hold four, wheeled luge clinics in July and August, with the goal of introducing the exciting sport of luge to youngsters in the Marquette County area.

The club will bring its portable luge ramp with coaches, wheeled sleds and safety equipment.

The Upper Peninsula Luge Club will show the proper techniques of artificial track sliding, such as those employed at the Olympic sites in Lake Placid, New York, and Park City, Utah, as well as the natural luge techniques needed to negotiate the track in Negaunee. These are the two styles practiced around the world.

“The summer wheeled clinics are a fun way to experience luge and find out about the sport,” said Fred Anderson, Upper Peninsula Luge Club official.

Release forms will be available for parents to sign for each youth to participate. The four clinics will be held at the following times and locations:

• 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. July 29 during Marquette Blueberry Fest in downtown Marquette

•  10 a.m. to 4 p.m. July 30 at Baraga State Park in Baraga.

• 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. August 20 at Can Riper State Park in Michigamme.

• 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. August 27, during HarborFest in Mattson Lower Harbor Park in Marquette.

For more information, contact Fred Anderson by phone at 250-1813 or via email at fanderson@andercomm.com.

— Upper Peninsula Luge Club

Liberty Children arts camps continue

Liberty Children’s Art Project (LCAP) will  have a five-day art camp for children entering first through eighth grades at the Powell Township School Art Garage. The first camp will be held Monday through Friday, August 15 to 19 from 1 to 2:30 p.m. This session will feature two classes, one for first through fourth grade and another for fifth through eighth grade. The younger students’ class, “Mural Painting, Printmaking and Clay, OH MY” will use a variety of art methods to create large-scale works of art. The older students’ class, “Just Clay, Part II,”’ will emphasis learning to throw pots on the potter’s wheel, as well as working with clay sculpture techniques with a concentration on carving with clay.  For both sessions, a professional artist/art educator will instruct the students.

These classes will meet at the Powell Township School Art Garage located at 101 Deutsch in Big Bay.  Students are welcome to come to some or all days.

These drop-in classes are free of charge to Powell Township children, but open to all children in the U.P. for $25 per week, or $5 for a one-day workshop. The courses are made possible through the generosity of the Marquette Rotary Club, Michigan Council for Art and Cultural Affairs, and the National Endowment for the Arts.   

For more information and to register call LCAP Director Carol Phillips at 228-3956 or e-mail carolannphillips@hotmail.com.

 — LCAP

SAYT acting camps run through August

Superior Arts Youth Theater continues to host acting camps through August as part of the Creative Community Series in Marquette.

All camps will take place at the City of Marquette Arts and Culture Center in the lower level of the Peter White Public Library, located at 217 N. Front St. in Marquette.

To register for a camp online, complete registration form and pay via Paypal. Online registrants can download a consent form to be brought to the first session. Consent forms will also be available on location for completion at the start of camp.

Registrants who do not want to sign up online may also download a registration form and mail it to the Arts and Culture Center with a payment included in the envelope.

The following is a list of August camps:

Preschool and Elementary School Acting Camp

• 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. August 1 through 5

• 1 to 3 p.m. Friday performance

Youth ages preschool to 8 years old will have an opportunity to be introduced or expand their skills in the Preschool and Elementary School Acting Camp. Youth will be introduced to all aspects of acting, music, and dance while working on a final production. Acting games and imagination exercises will be used to teach.

Elementary School Acting Camp

• 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. August 8 through 12

• 1 to 3 p.m. Friday performance

Youth ages 8 to 12 years old will have an opportunity to be introduced or expand their skills in the Elementary School Acting Camp. Youth will be introduced to all aspects of acting, music, technical theatre, and dance while working on a final production.

Preschool and Elementary School Acting Camp

• 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. August 15 through 19

• 1 to 3 p.m. Friday performance

Youth ages preschool to 8 years old will have an opportunity to be introduced or expand their skills in the Preschool and Elementary School Acting Camp. Youth will be introduced to all aspects of acting, music, and dance while working on a final production. Acting games and imagination exercises will be used to teach.

Musical Theatre Camp

• 1 to 4 p.m. August 22 through 26

• 4 to 6 p.m. Friday performance

Musical theatre camps are for students ages 8 and up ready to develop or increase skills in all areas of musical theatre. Camps are themed around specific Broadway show styles. Camp activities include learning music, staging, choreography, and rehearsal terminology. The final day will feature student collaboration in developing a musical showcase of material that is performed for family and friends at the end of camp.

 — Marquette Arts and Culture Center

Sawyer Family Fun Day set for August 7

Sawyer International Airport is hosting its 3rd Annual Discover Sawyer Family Fun Day August 7.

The event, which offers free admission, will include a pancake breakfast, a kid zone, helicopter rides, a car show and  Young Eagle Flights for kids ages 8 to 17. Several displays will also be on hand, including displays of R/C models, static aircraft and airport equipment displays as well as Sawyer business and vendor displays.

Food vendors will also be available during the event, which runs from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. For more information visit facebook.com/discoversawyer.

 — Sawyer International Airport

Making rock art projects

Rocks—children throw, skip, collect, study, pile and sort them. Whatever they do, children love them. They are an excellent addition to a family’s bags of tricks for any occasion. Rocks also make easy and cheap art projects like rock mosaics and pictures. Supervise so children do not put rocks in their mouth.

To make rock mosaics, simple pictures, or words like “love,” “welcome” or their name, children can collect small one or two-inch diameter rocks on beaches and coves. Even sandy beaches have small rocks often smoothed by wave action.

Making Mosaics

Bring along many plastic bags for different colored rocks like red, grey, black, tan, white and black. Look for dark, light, medium and mixed rocks of each color. Search for smooth, rough and pointed ones. When back at home, sort them into plastic containers.

After washing and drying rocks, they can be hot glued onto larger rocks, boards or flower pots. Other sturdy glues also work.

Rock pictures are beautiful gifts. Families can look through coloring books with large simple pictures of nature like flowers, turtles, trees, birds, fish, and rainbows. Help children decide what to decorate with rock mosaic. Cut out the coloring book picture and trace the outline of the picture onto the object to be decorated. Place the picture on a table so children can practice arranging rocks one-eighth to one-fourth inch apart to make a mosaic. Then help glue the rocks onto the board or rock starting with the outline first and filling in with rocks, working toward the center. After drying or cooling you may coat with Mod Podge to keep the rocks shiny or leave them natural.

River rocks are also good choices for mosaics. They are smoother and can be more pleasing to the eye because they are similar shapes but come in different soft colors.  Bags of them can be purchased at craft stores.

Dyeing Rocks

Porous igneous rocks like granite, basalt, pumice or lava rocks(scoria) have the ability to soak up fabric dye or food coloring when heated. First clean the rocks thoroughly under running water and dry with a cloth.

Place rocks in a cool oven. Then heat the oven and rocks until the oven temperature is approximately 200 degrees Fahrenheit. Do not overheat.

Prepare the dye solution according to the package’s instructions. Use heated water so that the hot rocks do not crack or split when placed in the dye.

Remove rocks carefully from the oven with tongs. Place them in the heated dye solution and leave rocks submerged in the dye overnight. Remove, rinse and dry. Sort and make works of art.

For more fun with rocks visit the sitgrandparentsteachtoo.blogspot.com or wufm.org/Learning through the Seasons, live and pod casts.

 — Grandparents Teach, Too

MRHC hosts Tombstone Detectives

The Marquette Regional History Center will host Tombstone Detectives from 1 to 3 p.m. Tuesday, August 23, at Park Cemetery.

Participants should meet at the main gate for this popular, family-friendly walking tour, which will include making tombstone rubbings and investigating symbols and clues. The stories of the people buried in the cemetery are fascinating and some will “come alive” to share theirs. This active walk throughout the cemetery is great for all ages. A $5 donation is suggested.

 — MRHC

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