March, 2017

From Thailand to Big Bay

Written by Liam-Ulland Joy, 11, with contributions from Elise Heide, 13, Anna Martinson, 12, Michael Mankee, 12, and Anja McBride, 11. What does the tropical, lush country of Thailand have in common with the little town of Big Bay Michigan, set on the shores of a chilly Lake Superior? Not much, but they do have […]

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A home for hospice

by Noah Hausmann Plans are in place to begin construction of the first hospice house in the Central U.P. this spring, as long as fundraising goals for what will be known as “Trillium House” are met. If all goes according to plan, the hospice house would be open to patients in the fall. The eight-bedroom […]

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What’s in your water?

John Cox, R.S., Environmental sanitarian Marquette County Health Department Many homes in Marquette County have on-site drinking water supplies, which is simply, a well versus a municipal drinking water supply. A municipal water supply is overseen by the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ). MDEQ requires regular water sampling and qualified staff to maintain the […]

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Celebrating the U.P.

Mary Burns pauses from her work for a quick picture. Some of the weavings for her “Ancestral Women: 12 Tribes of Wisconsin” exhibit, are shown on the wall behind her Jacquard loom. A portion of this exhibit will be on display in Marquette during the 8th annual Celebrate the U.P.! event in March. Burns’ husband John […]

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On Parr

Can by Candace Prill Charlie Parr remembers being influenced by his father’s record collection as early as 4 years old. He refers to it as weird old blues and folk, music that crossed genre boundaries, music that feels weird now but didn’t then because he didn’t know any different. Parr recalls his first relationship with […]

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Barking up the right tree

Scot Stewart Bark, a trees first and largest form of protection, comes in all shapes, sizes, patterns and colors. Trees pictured are: Top row from left, balsam poplar; American beech with a fungus growing on the bark; red pine; white ash. Middle row, from left, trembling aspen; white birch; striped maple, also known as moosewood; […]

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My heroes have always been women

by Lon Emerick And they still are, it seems (Thank you, Willie Nelson, My Heroes Have Always Been Cowboys). Females are special with their own brand of frustration from being marginalized too long. Sadly, many still struggle for themselves, their daughters and for women everywhere. Now, a nostalgic octogenarian, I often sit and muse a […]

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Superior Reads

Lost in the Woods: Building a Life Up North by Richard Hill Richard Hill’s new book, Lost in the Woods, details his and his wife Judy’s building a log cabin in the U.P. For years, they had operated a business in Traverse City, but they missed their family in the U.P. so they purchased land […]

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Gift of Water

By Rachel Holman Someone needs to explain to me why wanting clean drinking water makes you an activist, and why proposing to destroy water with chemical warfare doesn’t make a corporation a terrorist. — Winona LaDuke, Anishinaabe activist In our time, social activism is vital to the continuing health of our species. Our situation and […]

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Home Cinema

by Leonard G. Heldreth The films this month come from three different countries and illustrate dramatically how world cinema differs from that of the English-speaking world. Under the Shadow Iranian director Babak Anvari sets his debut film, Under the Shadow, in Tehran, the city in which he was born. The time is 1988, the final […]

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March 2017 City Notes

City Notes Dear Reader, With another new month, comes another new Marquette Monthly. I’ve always likde that about print publications. No matter what else is happening in the world, no matter how bad (or good) the news, no matter how bad (or good) the weather, a new Marquette Monthly will always be there to greet […]

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Natures pollinators

— Sam Henke Marquette Food Co-op One way to understand the underlying nature of an agricultural system is as an ecosystem, an interconnected and interdependent web that is determined by a wide host of human-based, physical and biological factors. Using an ecological lens to assess our local food system is another way to hone in […]

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Kids Count data shows Michigan has work to do

Lawmakers, educators, and professionals in the social work field gathered inside the Marquette-Alger Regional Educational Services Agency recently to examine the latest Kids Count in Michigan report, and look for ways to serve children better. The annual data book is released by the Michigan League for Public Policy. Kids Count in Michigan Project Director Alicia […]

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Shinrin-yoku or ‘Forest Bathing’

by Dr. Scott Emerson It is well documented that nature parks provide many billions of dollars in economic and environmental benefits to our communities in the United States. According to the City Parks Alliance, these include cleaning the air and water, cooling cities, increasing property values and tax revenues, increasing social cohesion, decreasing crime rates, […]

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Help from above

— Larry Chabot Imagine airplanes thundering overhead every two minutes, 24 hours a day, non-stop, for 15 months. One-a-minute, some days. How could one sleep through the racket? But if that cargo passing overhead was saving lives, well, that’s okay. That’s exactly what happened, and at least two U.P. men were among those who pulled […]

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