December, 2009
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The Burden of Narnia: Peeking through a winter’s window

By: Jon Magnuson  As darkness falls ever earlier these afternoons, those of us in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula huddle down to prepare for another winter. Along with splitting wood for our stoves and finishing up the last of canning from another fall harvest, the time of storytelling, dreams, feasts and lights has arrived. A world of […]

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A word to the wise – December 2009

Verbum satis sapientibus: A word to the wise is sufficient By: Gerald Waite Christmas is coming. You may have noticed. And despite all the holiday evidence in our culture, Christmas for countless centuries has been preeminently a religious festival. However, pagan festivals in many cultures influenced the timing as well as the traditions we still […]

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Star Date: December 2009

By: Craig Linde Moon & Planets—Jupiter is the only planet present in the evening sky. It is in the south after sunset and sets around midnight. Mars rises before midnight and will be getting high in the south by first light. Saturn rises a few hours before sunrise and is up in the southeast by dawn. […]

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City Notes – December 2009

 Edited by Kristy Basolo Dear editor MooseWood Nature Center would like to say thank you to all the participants who came out in support of the 2009 Haunted Bog Walk and Friendly Frights Forest fund-raiser. MooseWood and its critters depend on the generosity of the community to make our largest fund-raiser a success. Thank you […]

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1949: Marquette turns 100

by: Larry Chabot  The latest, most irresistible, life-changing force burst upon the U.P. scene at the William Norrgard home on Lincoln Avenue in Marquette on December 15, 1949. After returning from a trip to the Lundquist & Johnson Store, Mr. Norrgard hauled in the first home television set in the Upper Peninsula (an Escanaba tavern […]

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Not every gift is wrapped

by: Moira D. Reynolds  It was a Christmas Eve in the early 1940s—during the war years. A small tree decorated with bright balls and a little star stood on top of a file cabinet. Christmas cards from near and far were thumbtacked to the back of one door. There was an opened box of chocolates […]

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Host responsibly

By: Sarah Derwin One of the most popular holiday drinks, eggnog, has a long history both in America and its origins in Europe. It is believed that the first eggnog was made of sherry and milk and served in wooden mugs commonly called “noggins.” In colonial America, the sherry was replaced with rum, which was not […]

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Holding hands with ghosts

By: Don Curto The holiday season has begun. Some local stores are leapfrogging over Thanksgiving and plopping right into Christmas. But it is a mistake to slide over Thanksgiving. Before the turkey is carved, before the oyster stuffing gets its gravy, before the baked potato is squeezed, massaged and gently broken in half as my grandfather […]

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Nonphysical challenges key to health

By: Faye Bowers Helen Bush, an engaging, elegant, near-centenarian, quickly evaluates the thirteen cards she’s been dealt. She then lays down her bid of one club, and soon, via a set of signal bids with her bridge partner, reaches a contract of four hearts. Helen’s play of hand, as her appearance, is impeccable. She could, […]

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Music is medicine, literally

By: April Lindala Many of you know the Upper Peninsula is a community of people made up of different ancestries, background, education levels and socioeconomic statuses. More importantly, how many of your neighbors contain that significant trait that makes the U.P. someplace extraordinary—the willingness to help a friend in need? One of the friends of the […]

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CCAA celebrates birthday milestone

By: Linden Dahlstrom Celebrating a fiftieth birthday, the Copper Country Associated Artists (CCAA) are exhibiting in their studio gallery a collection of original work selected by each member artist in honor of the event. The fiftieth exhibit opens as part of the Calumet 5th Street First Friday activities on December 4. For both a birthday and […]

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The art of giving

By: Terri Gadzinski  ’Tis the season for giving. Whether the gift is a new necktie, an hour of your time or a charitable donation, the power of giving is limitless. Like a tiny seed, a single gift has the power to yield a hundredfold when planted with a little love and foresight. With love and foresight, […]

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U.P. history told through art

By: Christine Saari Melissa Matuscak, director of NMU’s DeVos Art Museum, got goosebumps when she first came across a painting by Trenary folk artist Niel Haapala (1909-2002) in the museum’s permanent collection. “The visual quality jumped out at me,” she said of the image titled Ready to Ice the Road. “I could feel the artist was […]

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U.P.’s CCC history proves nostalgic, yet relevant today

By: Tyler Tichelaar Earlier this year, I reviewed William Jamerson’s novel Big Shoulders about a young man who goes to work in a CCC (Civilian Conservation Corps) camp in the 1930s. I was curious to read the book after attending Jamerson’s talk about the CCC at Peter White Public Library a year before where the room […]

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